Insurance Adjuster Renewal

Find what you need to renew your insurance adjuster license.

adjuster-renewal

How to Renew Your Insurance Adjuster License

All insurance adjusters are required to understand how to evaluate property damage and loss as part of an insurance claim. Continuing education and keeping your license current is a critical step to working as an insurance adjuster.

While the insurance adjuster license renewal process is unique to each state, almost all follow a similar procedure to make sure that insurance adjusters are held to high professional standards and have the training needed to perform their jobs.


Follow our step-by-step guide to renew your insurance adjuster’s license.

How Do I Renew My Insurance Adjuster’s License?

Licensing for insurance agents and insurance adjusters is regulated by each state. Requirements can vary, but many states follow similar licensing and renewal procedures. These procedures apply to all adjusters, whether employed by a company, working as a public adjuster, or self-employed.



Step 1Step 1: Complete Insurance Adjuster Continuing Education

As an insurance agent or adjuster, you are required to complete continuing education (CE). These classes are often offered through an independent provider that is approved by your state. Visit your state licensing authority for a list of approved continuing education classes.

Recommended

For adjuster continuing education classes, StateRequirement recommends:

The number of necessary CE hours varies by state. Many states require between 20 and 40 hours of CE. A two year renewal requirement is the most common, but some states do allow three or four years to complete your required continuing education.

Any continuing education classes approved by your state’s authority will count toward your CE hours. You should try to take a broad range of topics to ensure that you are up-to-date on the skills and knowledge you need to be a successful insurance adjuster.

You will not receive credit for repeat courses within the same renewal period. Make sure that you register for CE courses that provide new and valuable training as part of your professional development. You can also receive CEs for participating in some professional organizations or attending professional education events and seminars.

You may need to take a test at the end of your course, but it will only cover the information provided in the class. This test will not be like the original licensing exam; rather, it will be taken on your PC in the comfort of your own home and without any proctors present.

Many states base your CE deadline on your birth date rather than your license issue date.

For example, North Carolina requires those with October birthdays to complete their CEs by the end of October in the year that their license expires. If you are born in an even year, your license expires during even years. If you are born in an odd year, your license expires during odd years.


Continuing Education Topics

  • General training
  • Ethics training (some states require each renewal period)
  • Flood insurance (some states require each renewal period)

 

You should plan to have your continuing education complete at least 30 days prior to your license expiration date. This allows time for the education provider, usually an independent company, to report your completion to your state authority. You can also provide a transcript directly, which may take longer to verify and process.

Tip:

Some circumstances, such as a military deployment or certain medical conditions, allow you to apply for a waiver or extension. Check with your state’s insurance licensing authority to see if you qualify.


Step 2Step 2: Renew Through Your State

As an insurance adjuster, you will be licensed in an individual state, also known as your Resident State. If your state does not offer insurance licensing, you can choose a Designated Home State (DHS) when you get your initial license. To renew your insurance adjuster license, you are required to meet the continuing education requirements for your Resident State or DHS.

Renewing your insurance adjuster license can be done through your state’s regulatory authority, such as the Department of Insurance or State Corporation Commission. Some states use an independent processing service for license applications and renewals and provide these links on their websites.

To renew your insurance adjuster license, you will need to provide your email, full name, and National Producer Number (NPN). Some states allow you to look up your license using your social security number as well. You can manage your insurance adjuster license, including renewals, through the National Insurance Producer Registry.

You will be required to pay a renewal fee, which can range from $5 to $50 or more. Additional fees are usually added if you are applying within a few weeks of your license expiration or are using a third-party processing service. You can renew through the mail or in-person applications, but most prefer you apply for your renewal online to streamline the process.

Tip:

Make sure that your mailing address is current. Most states will mail a copy of your new license to the mailing address on file. Instructions for changing your address are available through your state insurance authority.


Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs)

Do Insurance Adjuster Licenses Expire?

As long as you complete your continuing education requirements and pay your renewal fee by the designated time, your license will remain valid. The deadline for renewal varies by state, making it very important to research and understand your state’s requirements.

Your expiration date and continuing education requirements are based on your Resident State or Designated Home State, even if you reside in another state. You should follow the regulations and procedures of that state where you were initially licensed.

 

How Much Does It Cost to Renew Insurance Adjuster License?

Most states charge a fee to renew your insurance adjuster license. Renewal fees range from $5 to $50, with additional fees for late renewal and processing, if your state requires that you submit through a third-party service. Renewal fees can be paid with credit or debit card using the state’s online renewal service.

 

What States Have Reciprocity for Adjuster License?

After you completed your initial license requirements, you may have applied for reciprocity in other states. This is common in insurance licensing, as you may need to work outside of your state, especially during catastrophes. You should still follow the renewal guidance from your Resident State or DHS.

Many states that offer reciprocity will accept CE and renewal documents from your licensing state without requiring additional licensing documentation or fees.

 

Can I Renew My Insurance Adjuster License After It Expires?

If your license does expire, your state may have a grace period during which you can complete your CEs and pay a higher fee. For example, in North Carolina you have four months past your license expiration to complete your CEs. If you finish within that four month widow, you can pay an additional fee to have your license reinstated.

Other states, such as Texas, require you to pay a fee or fine if you do not complete your CEs on time but want to renew your license. Late fees can be $25 per renewal or up to $50 per CE hour, depending on the state. After paying the fine and completing the required CEs, you will be able to continue with the renewal process.

If your insurance adjuster license expires and you do not complete your CEs within the window, most states require that you complete your pre-licensing education and application again.

Tip:

Set reminders on your calendar leading up to your license renewal deadline to make sure you finish your continuing education on time. This can save you time and money during the renewal process.

Information on this page has been gathered by a multitude of sources and was most recently updated on October 2020.

Any Information on this site is not guaranteed or warranted to be correct, accurate, or up to date. StateRequirement and its members and affiliates are not responsible for any losses, monetary or otherwise. StateRequirement is not affiliated with any state, government, or licensing body. For more information, please contact your state’s authority on insurance.

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