How to Become a Notary in Missouri

Written by: Nik Ventouris

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How to Become a Notary in Missouri

Looking to make a difference in your community? Let us guide you on a rewarding journey towards a unique profession.

In this comprehensive guide on how to become a notary in Missouri, we lay out the roadmap to achieving this goal. With easy-to-follow, actionable steps, we’ll help you navigate this intriguing process, turning the complex into simple.

Whether you’re looking to serve your community or generate additional income, this article will offer everything you need to know to get started.

Recommended: Interested in getting started? Have a look at the National Notary Association’s packages, which include all state-required notary supplies, a surety bond, and four years of notary hotline phone support.

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Become a Notary in Missouri

In order to become a notary in Missouri, you will need to complete a few simple steps.

Step 1: Meet the Eligibility Requirements

In Missouri, there are minimum requirements that applicants must meet if they want to become notaries public. However, these eligibility requirements differ for residents and non-residents:

Missouri Residents

As a Missouri resident, you will need to:

  • Be at least eighteen years old
  • Reside or regularly work in Missouri (this also applies if you’re a permanent resident alien)
  • Legally reside in the United States
  • Be able to read and write English
  • Not have had your commission revoked during the five years prior to your application
  • Not have been found guilty or be involved in a criminal prosecution for any felony/offense involving dishonesty or moral turpitude during the five years prior to your application

Non-Residents

If you are not a resident of the state, you will need to:

  • Be at least eighteen years old
  • Work in Missouri and use the notary seal in your line of work in the state
  • Have a work address in the county you’re applying to be commissioned in
  • Be able to read and write in English
  • Not have had your commission revoked in any state during the five years prior to your application
  • Not have been found guilty or involved in a criminal prosecution under any state’s laws for a felony/offense involving dishonesty or moral turpitude during the five years prior to your application
  • Authorize the Secretary of State to act as your representative and accept service of any process or notice permitted by law to be served to you

Note: You can be immediately appointed as a notary in Missouri if you’re currently commissioned as a non-resident notary public. All you need to do is request for the non-resident commission to be canceled and pay $25 for a new one in Missouri to be issued.

Step 2: Take a State-Approved Training Course

Once confirming that you satisfy these eligibility requirements, you can get started by reading through the Missouri Notary Public Handbook.

After this, you’ll be able to take a state-approved notary training course, which can be taken in one of two ways:

You will be required to attest to reading this handbook and successfully completing this training when you submit your notary public application.

Note: In order to be able to perform electronic notarial acts you’re going to need to undergo another training course and obtain an electronic notary seal.

Recommended Course

Have a look at the National Notary Association’s packages, which include all state-required notary supplies, a surety bond, and four years of notary hotline phone support.

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Step 3: Complete the Notary Public Application

The next step is to file your notary public application with the Secretary of State. This can be done electronically on the Secretary of State’s website, by calling (866) 223-6535, or by mailing the SOS at the following address:

Secretary of State Commissions
PO Box 784 Jefferson City
MO 65102-0784

You will find guided instructions on how to complete this form within the application. Make sure to pay attention to these instructions as it can delay your application if you fill it out incorrectly.

Note: For more guidance on completing your application form, see the Secretary of State’s website.

Step 4: Get a $10,000 Surety Bond

If the Office of the Secretary of State approves your application, the next step is to obtain a $10,000 Missouri notary bond from any licensed surety.

This bond should have a term of four years that lasts from the date your Missouri notary commission is issued to the date it expires.

You need to execute this bond within 60 days of your application being approved by the Secretary of State.

Note: This bond is not interchangeable with errors and omissions insurance. Notary bonds are required by law, whereas E&O insurance is only recommended due to the protection it provides to notaries public.

Step 5: Take Oath of Office and File Required Documents

Within 60 days of your application’s approval, you must present your surety bond to the County Clerk’s office and take your oath of office in person (signing it with your official notary signature).

After you’ve done this, the clerk or deputy should hand you your notary commission certificate. You will be required to mail your oath of office and surety bond to the Office of the Secretary of State within seven days of taking your oath.

Note: If you are unable to qualify within these 60 days, you may be required to restart your Missouri notary application.

Step 6: Protect Yourself with Errors and Omissions Insurance

While not required by law, it’s a good idea to consider protecting yourself with Errors and Omissions (E&O) insurance.

This type of insurance provides coverage for any potential mistakes or omissions that you might make as you perform notarial acts.

It’s an extra layer of protection that can give you peace of mind while operating for a relatively low opportunity cost.

Step 7: Obtain Missouri Notary Supplies

Finally, you’ll need to acquire your notary public supplies.

These include your Missouri notary stamp or seal (used to affix to documents), as well as your public journal.

Remember that, as a notary, you will serve a vital role in your community. This responsibility requires diligence, precision, and a high ethical standard.

Recommended: Interested in getting started? Have a look at the National Notary Association’s packages, which include all state-required notary supplies, a surety bond, and four years of notary hotline phone support.

4.5 out of 5 starsNational Notary Association ($165)

How to Become a Notary in Missouri FAQ

How much does it cost to be a notary in Missouri?

Overall, you can expect it to cost between $100–$150 to become a notary in Missouri. This figure includes a $25 application fee, the cost of a $10,000 surety bond (which is normally between $30–$50), and the costs of your custom notary stamp and journal.

What are the requirements for becoming a notary in Missouri?

To become a notary in Missouri, you must be at least 18 years old, be a legal resident of the state, and be able to read and write English. To find out more about becoming a notary in this state, see our article on How to Become a Notary in Missouri.

How much do notaries charge?

The amounts notaries are allowed to charge will vary depending on each state’s regulations, In Missouri, notaries can only charge up to $5 per notarial act for acknowledgments, jurats, oaths or affirmations, and protests. For all others, they may only charge up to $1. Notaries are also permitted to charge extra for travel costs if they deem it necessary.

How long does a notary commission last in Missouri?

In Missouri, a notary commission lasts for four years. It will begin on the date listed on the commission (its issuance date) and will expire four years later unless you resign, pass away, or have your notary commission revoked before that date. You’ll need to renew your commission before its expiry date to continue serving after these four years.

Do I need to complete any training to become a notary in Missouri?

Yes, in Missouri all applicants are required to read the Missouri Notary Public Handbook and finish either a written or online training course before they submit their application. For more guidance on the general process of becoming a notary, see our How to Become a Notary article.

For all related articles, have a look at our How to Become a Notary page.